9 Fall Simmer Pot Recipes (Crock Pot Potpourri)

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(Last Updated On: November 11, 2022)

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Simmer pots, also known as “crock pot potpourri”, are something I make year-round as an inexpensive (and fun) form of aromatherapy. In this post, I’m going to show you how to make my favorite fall simmer pot recipe and 8 additional autumn-inspired alternatives!

My entire calendar year is spent eagerly anticipating the holidays and all that comes with them. I live for the festivities, and I try to squeeze in a little holiday cheer wherever possible. The spicey aromas of fall are one of my favorite things about this time of year, but I go through scented candles faster than my wallet can keep up with.

Pomanders, or oranges pierced with cloves, are one fun DIY alternative to scented candles that I sometimes make. Still, I think simmer pots are more fun, especially because you can include so many different fragrances.

I made this fall simmer pot recipe on my stovetop, but you can also make yours in a crock pot or slow cooker to save on gas! I mean, they do call it “crock pot potpourri.” You can also use a candle-powered wax melt warmer to make a mini simmer pot without having to use gas or electricity at all! This is a great option if you have roommates and want to keep the aromas contained in a small space.

Why Make a Simmer Pot?

  • Simmer pots are a cheap alternative to scented candles.
  • Aromatherapy is an easy & effective way to practice self-care.
  • Not only is this fall simmer pot recipe festive & fragrant, but it also acts as a humidifier.
  • Fill your home with the fragrances of fall by using ingredients you probably already have in your kitchen!

What You Need To Make My Favorite Fall Simmer Pot

How To Make A Simmer Pot

Step 1: Start by slicing your apples, oranges, and ginger. Place them at the bottom of your pot along with your rosemary, sage, star anise, cloves, and cinnamon.

fall simmer pot ingredients

Step 2: Add in your vanilla and almond extract as well as enough water to cover your ingredients. Bring to a boil, and then reduce to a gentle simmer.

water being poured into simmer pot

Step 3: Check back periodically and add in more water if the levels become too low. I usually let mine simmer for about an hour and a half before refilling the pot with more water and giving it a little stir.

simmer pot close up

Alternative Fall Simmer Pot Recipes

These fall simmer pot recipes are all great starting points, but I encourage you to get creative!

Pumpkin Pie:

Cold-Fighting Simmer Pot:

Spiced Blueberry:

  • Blueberries
  • Black peppercorns
  • Bay leaves
  • Thyme
  • Lemons

Apple Harvest:

  • Apples
  • Cranberries
  • Cinnamon
  • Allspice
  • Vanilla extract

Pomegranate Rosemary:

  • Pomegranate
  • Rosemary
  • Parsley
  • Nutmeg

Grapefruit & Almond:

  • Grapefruit
  • Almond extract
  • Vanilla extract
  • Lavender essential oil

Blackcurrant & Orange:

Cinnamon Plum:

*I got the idea for this one from this amazing cinnamon plum tea. A must-try!

Other Ingredients To Consider

  • Fall scented premium grade fragrance oils
  • Flowers
  • Any of your favorite teas
  • Fresh herbs
  • Dry herbs
  • Fresh or dried fruits
  • Sprigs of pine, eucalyptus, etc.
  • Salts & spices

Recipe FAQs

How long do you do a simmer pot for?

Depending on what you include in your fall simmer pot, you can leave it to simmer anywhere from two hours to four days! You’ll have to periodically add more water as the simmer pot evaporates, but most ingredients will remain fragrant for a lot longer than you’d think. If you’re using fresh fruit, you probably don’t want to leave it out for more than a day because it may start to accumulate mold, but if you’re just simmering spices and herbs they’ll typically keep for several days.

What are simmer pots good for?

Simmer pots, also known as crock pot potpourri, are a fun and easy way to make your house smell incredible utilizing herbs, spices, and fruits. Not only do they provide you with a deliciously fragrant aroma, but they also act as a humidifier and can help to open your airways during dry weather or when you are sick.

In some cultures and religions, simmer pots are even used in rituals, with each ingredient bearing significance. In the spirit of spooky season, I recommend checking out this article, “Top 10 Magickal Herbs” for an interesting breakdown of the ritualistic use of herbs throughout history.

What to boil to make a house smell good?

To make your house smell good, I recommend boiling fresh oranges, apples, cinnamon sticks, cloves, fresh ginger, rosemary, sage, star anise, vanilla, and almond extract. You can get creative and make your house smell good by utilizing different herbs, spices, fruits, essential oils, or a combination of all of the above!

fall simmer pot ingredients in pot

Pro Tips

  • I used fresh rosemary and ginger, but you can also use dried rosemary and powdered ginger. You can also easily substitute the whole cloves and cinnamon stick with their powdered equivalents.
  • Check your crock pot potpourri every 1-2 hours to see if you need to add more water.
  • Making crock pot potpourri can be preferable to using a stovetop because you can leave it to sit a lot longer.
fall simmer pot close up
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5 from 3 votes

Fall Simmer Pot Recipe (Crock Pot Potpourri)

My favorite natural way to get the whole house smelling like fall!

Materials

  • 1 fresh orange
  • 1 fresh apple
  • 1 ginger root
  • 2 sprigs rosemary
  • 2 sprigs sage
  • 3 star anise
  • 1 tbsp cloves
  • 1 large cinnamon stick

Instructions

  • Start by slicing your apples, oranges, and ginger. Place them at the bottom of your pot along with your rosemary, sage, star anise, cloves, and cinnamon.
  • Add in your vanilla and almond extract as well as enough water to cover your ingredients. Bring to a boil, and then reduce to a gentle simmer.
  • Check back periodically and add in more water if the levels become too low. I usually let mine simmer for about an hour and a half before refilling the pot with more water and giving it a little stir.

Notes

  • I used fresh rosemary and ginger, but you can also use dried rosemary and powdered ginger. You can also easily substitute the whole cloves and cinnamon stick with their powdered equivalents.
  • Check your crock pot potpourri every 1-2 hours to see if you need to add more water.
  • Making crock pot potpourri can be preferable to using a stovetop because you can leave it to sit a lot longer. 

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8 Comments

  1. 5 stars
    I really like this idea. It really is a smart economical way to make your house smell good. You’re right candles CAN BE COSTLY! And sometimes candles don’t burn all the way down and that’s a waste as well. Thank you for the great idea. I CANT WAIT TO TRY IT OUT!

    1. Yes! I have so many candles that didn’t melt all the way and I’ve been trying to figure out ways to repurpose all that unmelted wax! Maybe I’ll do a post about that if I figure anything out haha. Enjoy your simmer pot! 🙂

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